r3dglasses:

Blackbanshee as swimsuitstuck roxy! 

Reposting without the craziness! 

(sorry ^^’)

mem - GREASE SONG
3,554 plays

nyannerz:

i was practicing singing and i made this, it’s really gay and dumb and i have no idea why i did it but here it is in all its glory, -turns into sand- goodbye

themadkingreigns:

This is the greatest Youtuber of All Time

Congratulations to (finally) reaching 1 million subscribers, Cr1tikal!

psuedofolio:

kazerad:

For a while now I’ve been kind of meaning to write a long, in-depth post about 4chan. With the recent controversy between them and some significant feminist figures in the gaming industry, I think it’s important that I finally go ahead and do this. Since, let’s be honest: any time there’s a big…

I still love 4chan, I have (through some miracle) met some of my best friends on there. And a lot of my favorite pieces I’ve ever done were inspired by their boards.

My only addendum to Kazerad’s almost overly positive piece on 4chan is that the same “conspiracy” mindset that it extends to other sites or personages around the internet also pops against themselves. The same anonymity which is incredibly important to making 4chan work at its best also fuels it at its worst. And if you’ve been inside the community long enough, or have read one too many plainly copypasta’d troll posts, you can become cynical of anon’s motives.

This shows up most on anything that has reached any degree of popularity. It’s impossible to come up with concrete facts to back up this statement, but after a point there’s the suspicion that many of the posts you’re reading are coming from the same source. This is especially true if you’re reading something you disagree with. And there’s a lot of suspicion among each other that one or a few people are perpetuating a single line over the course of days or weeks or months to create the impression that they represent a majority of the collective.

This isn’t impossible, it just takes a significant amount of time invested in making sure you’re there everyday with the same repetitive comments. They’ll often ignore evidence to the contrary just to repeat their point, and are impossible to be held accountable to. They’re not seeking discussion, they’re only seeking dissemination of their agenda. (Just like many other internet persons with a point to make) And the suspicion that every other post could be this same person pretending to be coming from more than one person can make certain discussions toxic to 4chan itself.

There are a number of conversations where anons just give up trying to correct people who have an unwillingness to adapt their views, the more persistently repeated view point then continues on to “win” the long war. And this method can change things pretty maliciously. In this way, it’s not all that different from how Tumblr or the internet at large can behave at its worst. 4chan users can still be just as unaccountable to facts or healthy discussion as any other site on the internet.

But that’s all I should add on the subject. Anonymity is an important resource for all the points Kazerad had just made.

Being able to exist as a an identity-less anon, with a malleable opinion, with valuable things to learn or add to a discussion, is probably the closest to being a mind free of race, gender, disability, or age as you can get on this planet. For at least that one reason alone, I would say I still love 4chan.

Faceless Together

phrux:

kazerad:

For a while now I’ve been kind of meaning to write a long, in-depth post about 4chan. With the recent controversy between them and some significant feminist figures in the gaming industry, I think it’s important that I finally go ahead and do this. Since, let’s be honest: any time there’s a big controversy on the internet, 4chan is going to be involved. And yet, a lot of people don’t really understand what 4chan is.

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First, I should probably start with some explanation of where I am coming from. When my webcomic first began taking off, I went to great lengths to keep an eye on everyone who discussed it. I like feedback on what I’m doing; the way I see it, the natural progression of an artistic career is that you eventually come to rely on audience feedback rather than individual critics who purport to represent it.

For the most part, this just entailed reading forums and blogs, nothing too complicated. however, there was this one audience segment that continually eluded my sight: 4chan. I could see 4chan links in my referrers, but could never find anything there about me or my work. The threads, with their short, transient lifespans, were always gone by the time I got there.

Well, needless to say, I eventually did catch a Prequel thread, and then more, and gradually over the next few years I learned a lot about 4chan - as well as a lot of other sites, major and minor (this one included). Of them all, though, 4chan stands out to me as having the most interesting culture - as well as being one of the most confusing, misunderstood, and outright scary entities to outsiders. I can understand why they are such a prevalent and relatively powerful force online, and I think it’s important for everyone to understand exactly what 4chan is.

I’m going to be sharing my personal observations and conclusions regarding 4chan. So, buckle up and put on your ethnologist hats, kids, because we’re gonna talk comparative internet cultures!

Anonymity

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The first thing that always trips people up about 4chan is this idea of an “anon culture”. Like, we all understand the idea of anonymous comments on a site, or accepting anonymous asks on Tumblr, and probably understand that such anonymous submissions are often used to attack someone without suffering any social ramifications or backlash for doing so. But what happens when you bring hundreds of thousands of people together who idolize the idea of anonymity and the freedom it brings?

Well, you get something kind of cool, in my opinion. What you end up with is this concept of a fluid identity. Not only do people on 4chan have no social ramifications for being rude, but they face no social ramifications for being inconsistent with themselves. On 4chan you have no obligation to stick to or defend your past beliefs or opinions, because no one knows they were your past beliefs, nor do you have any incentive to display beliefs that will make you look good - since no one will ever even know it was you.

It’s like… imagine being an invisible person in a room with a bunch of other invisible people. You, as well as each of them, are wearing an (also invisible) random voice-changing mask. From the seemingly empty room, one voice calls out: “so, what webcomics do you guys read?”

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If you were in a public place, you’d pick the answer that makes you look good. It’ll be something pretentious (if you’re around pretentious people), or something relatively normal and acceptable (if you’re around normal people), and you’ll choose the answer that doesn’t ostracize you otherwise negatively affect you socially.

In the room of invisible people, that pressure does not exist. You are speaking to the equivalent of an empty room. You can say the most embarrassing shit you can think of - let them know about that horrible, poorly-drawn DeviantArt comic series you are super into. If they laugh at you for it and you regret your choice to bring it up, then all you have to do is step a few feet to the left and say you like something else. All of a sudden, you and are effectively a different person. Alternatively, you could just own up to your love of this awesome DeviantArt comic. Why not? You can unassociate yourself from these claims at any time.

Or, imagine someone else in the room says they like some poorly-written little ComicGenesis comic, and you decide to rail on them about how horrible it is. Suddenly, they come back at you with this amazing explanation about its hidden nuances, and you realize that you misjudged this little comic and it is in fact the epitome of perfection. If you want, you can just instantly pretend you are a different person who liked the comic all along. You don’t have to feel any shame for wrongly disliking it at first, or any obligation to remain consistent with your earlier beliefs. You just do what you feel like. It can’t hurt you. You are just you.

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Of course, the consequence of this is that 4chan is completely depraved by normal societal standards. Without the pressure to conform, it turns out people are naturally pretty weird. But, you know, they live it. It’s a culture where nobody is really shamed or hurt for the things they enjoy. Someone can try to shame them, but it’s not going to have any effect and it’s usually more of a joke.

The other consequence of this - and the one that probably scares the most visitors away - is that people can’t really be shamed for being what we would consider horrible people. Someone can be flagrantly racist, homophobic, misogynistic, or whatever, and you can’t really harm them. All you can do is talk to them. Things that would garner death threats on Tumblr or Twitter tend to be short, comparatively nonconfrontational exchanges on 4chan. With many people from Tumblr or Twitter, that does not sit well.

The Anon

Sort of separate from this idea of “anon culture” is this idea of “the Anon” as an individual.

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When we get an anonymous hate comment on Tumblr or something, we know that person has an actual identity they are hiding. It becomes a guessing game as we speculate who they “really are”,

With 4chan, however, there is this idea of anonymity as an identity. By posting an anonymous message, you are not “hiding” your identity, you are an Anon. In their art, you typically see the Anon represented as a thin, green-skinned man or woman with a suit and no facial features other than a mouth. It’s an intentionally race- and class-neutral representation of a human - the Anon can be anybody. They celebrate this idea that they are indistinguishable - coming across as one single, undefined individual with a lot of conflicting tastes and perspectives.

This is a somewhat foreign idea on other internet cultures like Tumblr, where individuality is greatly valued. Look at anyone’s Tumblr page - we go to great lengths to define what is us. We often wear a banner declaring our race, gender, and sexual orientation. We list our interests and phobias. We even choose a picture to represent ourselves - mine is a little blue butterfly drawn by me and colored by a friend. Our identity gains strength and influence as we do things that please people, and weakens as we do things that they disapprove of. After posting this, my influence will probably reach 1,100 people, and I’ll do a little dance in celebration of this milestone. But, posting in a random 4chan thread, I would still just be an anon like everyone else.

The World To 4chan

Looking at it from this perspective, you can hopefully start to understand the political angles that someone who regularly participates in 4chan is inclined to take.

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In their own weird way, 4chan is a sort of utopia. They circumvent a lot of the harassment problems that places like Tumblr and Twitter have. You probably aren’t going to see someone on 4chan depressed over harassment they got on 4chan. They also circumvent most peer pressure problems - nobody on 4chan is going to agree with anyone else there just to look good. You are also going to have very few people who hide things, since there’s very little incentive to do so. If you feel a little gay that day and want some hot beefcake, say it, nobody will care and you’ll be happy.

Imagine how the rest of the internet looks to someone who is used to that as their background, though. It causes the person to develop a certain distrust. If someone publicly supports a position and a large group praises and rewards them for it, you wonder if they really believe what they profess. When someone publicly attacks and uses social leverage against a person who disagrees with them, you wonder if the attacker really has a decent argument that could stand on its own. The world becomes a vicious and uncivilized place full of powerful, violent people who might be lying or keeping secret agendas, and you want to look into it. You want to knock people off pedestals, jam their weapons, air their secrets, and leave nothing but a depraved and equal Anon behind.

And you see that in what 4chan does. When a controversial figure declares they were hacked or bullied, 4chan are the ones compiling evidence of whether or not it was faked. When someone tries to defend a position with their social standing or identity, 4chan is the first to stand against them, confronting them as an equal. And when someone preaches what others should be doing, 4chan is the first to get on their case if they don’t do it themselves. They are not a unified group so much as a group of people who share a common mindset - that inequality and its associated social pressures are the root cause of problems. They tend to confront people as equals - and if that doesn’t work, they try to knock them down to their level.

4chan To The World

Equally important to understanding 4chan, I think, is looking at the way 4chan is seen and portrayed by others - especially those who actively oppose its ideals.

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It’s no secret that 4chan is often viewed as this hive of racism, homophobia and misogyny. They’re this chaotic force that harasses feminists, hacks websites, and spreads the personal information of any good people who try to stand up for justice. It’s this vague, faceless force, and it fits the common perception of “evil mooks” we are fed in movies.

I find it kind of a shame that, for all that 4chan’s culture does to maintain the Anon’s gender, race, and class neutrality, the common assumption is that they consist entirely of middle-class, straight, white males. You see this whenever there’s some clash between 4chan and Tumblr - 4chan is the oppressor; some angry, privelaged mass that wants to make life difficult for minorities.

The nature of an anon culture makes it difficult to get actual statistics on 4chan - these are people who are not only anonymous, but often revel in the nature of anonymity. Race is almost impossible to analyze, since someone will only bring it up if it’s relevant to what they’re saying. Gender is easier though - according to 4chan’s advertising page, the userbase is 30% female - if you don’t believe their self-report, the third-party analytics site Alexa.com claims it to be over 50%. I have a few friends who frequent the site’s (often extremely risque) My Little Pony board - they once ran a lingerie selfie contest there, and exactly 50% of the entrants were female.

Overall, you’re looking at this very diverse community that has its minorities effectively erased by its opposition so it can make a better enemy. 4chan knows this, and you can see it leading back into that aforementioned concept of them seeing their detractors as hypocritical and barbaric. You’re not likely to get any big moment where 4chan’s minorities band together and say “hey, we exist!” because so much of 4chan values their anonymity. Gaining social leverage by declaring what you are is the sort of thing they generally stand against.

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Equally interesting is the way 4chan responds to hatred against them. Though it may not be readily apparent from the outside, they stick by their ideals at least as strenuously as Tumblr does. With the recent controversy in feminist gaming, for example, a number of people from 4chan have been watching Twitter and boycotting any company that claims the attack on The Fine Young Capitalists was justified. There’s been a lot of disappointment any time a loved developer comes to the attack’s defense. 

Similarly, there’s a lot of disappointment every time a creator directly speaks out against 4chan. I remember a time a few months back when the author of the comic Paranatural tweeted about how nobody should ever go to 4chan. Over on 4chan, there was a rather touching post where an anon described how it hurt them to have a figure they admire speak out against a community they loved. I actually emailed the Paranatural guy about that, though I never got a reply. I like to pretend it’s because he got a million other emails about it, but it’s probably not.

Open Door

I think the one last thing that is most misunderstood about 4chan is that if you are a horrible person, it can be a tool.

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4chan has no barriers to entry. There’s not even a signup process; anyone who wants to can go there and instantly become a part of their community. If you want to do something bad and hide that it was you, you can go to 4chan, make posts about it, and have it look like 4chan is to blame. You will suffer no ramifications for doing so - like any action on 4chan, it is effectively done by “the anon”.

Nothing keeps someone from setting 4chan up as a scapegoat. Heck , you could even go there and pose as multiple people, organizing entire attacks on someone. Even yourself, if you want. This is not a hard thing to do.

The question is why you would do it. Like, 4chan is fundamentally not a bad place. Its one property is that people there interact anonymously - for better or for worse, that ideal of fearlessly being the person you want to be is viciously preserved. It has a very interesting and generally nonconfrontational culture that can still bring ridiculous change or over-the-top revenges when them or their ideals are attacked directly. Between the social equality, lack of fear, and ability to drive action, it sometimes feels like everything Tumblr wants to be. 

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I guess what I’m saying is: be informed. It’s easy to use 4chan as a scapegoat, or construe it as an unstoppable force of evil, but if you really look into it it’s one of the more interesting cultural designs to come out of the internet. It’s worth lurking and understanding where they are coming from on things before dismissing them enemies.

Fucking fantastic explanation of 4chan. One thing that I’d like to add though- 4chan is not one thing. Each board has it’s own identity and culture.

rottenchicken:

I love her already

rottenchicken:

I love her already

kazerad:

I didn’t even know about this yesterday when I wrote that long post on Empowerment, but apparently there is some pretty big empowerment stuff going down right now. Or, at least trying to go down.

If you haven’t been following it, there was a whole bunch of scandal stuff recently in the indie gaming scene. I don’t really care. The important part is: a group called The Fine Young Capitalists - geared toward bringing more female developers into games and black creators into manga - has been under fire, getting slandered and having press coverage denied. And in the midst of it all, 4chan of all places has been banding together to come to their aid.

This is still a pretty fresh issue and essentially involves a fracturing of feminism, so I’d encourage you to look into it and draw your own conclusions before supporting anyone. Personally though, I really agree with the approach The Fine Young Capitalists are taking. It mirrors a lot of my feelings on empowerment - there is a recording where they talk about it at length. The important part:

We tried to explain this to journalists, and everybody just [said] “you need to have a woman who is oppressed, and to discuss it”. And it was very disheartening because we just wanted to do something were I could just point to them and say “This game. I helped this woman make this game. And the only reason I did it was because I really liked the game”. And it’s just… that was apparently the last message I should be giving. 

The Fine Young Capitalists have been having a hard time getting attention. There’s no figure they’re demonizing, no message of oppression they’re forwarding, nothing but this positive idea that women can make awesome gamesAnd yet, they’ve been getting flak for everything from their transgender policy (requesting that entrants in their female-only game contest have self-identified as female for at least six months) to the very fact that their organization is accepting money from 4chan. You know, accepting money to give to female game developers and charities.

They asked 4chan what they could do to gain attention, and at their suggestion TFYC has been doing a video series on significant women in the games industry. Not ranting about how the industry is unfair to women, or all the reasons women can’t become successful, but focusing on the awesome women who helped shape gaming today. 

I guess what I’m asking is: don’t let this group fade away. Gaming news outlets are refusing to cover them - possibly because they were doxxed, slandered, and ddos’d by a relatively popular name in and indie gaming. I’d encourage you to look into this group yourself, and if you like what they’re doing, show some support. 

It’s possible, as some have speculated, that we are currently living in a Wild West period of the Internet, a rough transition between lawlessness and civilization. In 15 years, will today’s online discourse look as raw and macho as an episode of “Deadwood”? The West, after all, was eventually civilized.

Trolls have taken over the Internet. (via salon)

The West after all, was eventually cleared and paved over as a culturally devoid minimall with a tanning salon, starbucks and walmart*

Free speech advocates may cry foul, but when speech becomes so shrill that it shouts down and shuts out certain voices, it’s not free anymore. Larry Rosenthal, a University of California, Berkeley, professor who specializes in civility and public discourse, says that what we gain might be worth the price we pay for restraining speech online.

"Free speech advocates may cry foul, but when speech becomes so shrill that it shouts down and shuts out certain voices, it’s not free anymore." certain voices, aka only voices i agree with.

I don't think Anita Sarkeesian's videos should be treated as an extension of the PMRC mindset. She's pointing out misogynistic tropes in video games, not advocating censorship. I mean hell, she starts her first video in the series saying that even though she's pointing out problematic aspects of games, that doesn't mean those games shouldn't be played or enjoyed. I don't understand why she's getting as much flack as she is.

theneedledrop:

Anita is getting flack because she’s an ignorant outsider. I’m not even a gamer, and this is apparent to me.

Whether you agree the content Anita showcases is misogynistic, offensive or not, most of her videos function on the same, flawed premise: That the negative gender stereotypes she finds in these games are harmful to the gamers that play them. She argues that these games somehow ingrain negative gender stereotypes in the individuals that play. They hurt women via perpetuating these stereotypes, essentially.

This is pure, unsubstantiated BS. Anita would never fund an actual study with the tens of thousands of dollars she’s raised, because she knows any such study wouldn’t work in her favor. It’s easier to buy a bunch of video games, cherrypick the most offensive parts for ignorant viewers, and then keep the rest of the money for yourself and your organization, right?

You’ve gotta wake up to the truth: Anita’s videos are about as effective and as enlightening as an elementary school screening of Reefer Madness

Media—especially popular media—reflects already-existing norms, ideas, concepts, and sentiments in a society, it doesn’t dictate them to consumers. Slasher flicks don’t make serial killers. Grand Theft Auto doesn’t increase the probability of shooting sprees. Gangsta rap doesn’t create gangs. The game Bully doesn’t create bullies. Reading 50 Shades of Grey probably doesn’t increase the likelihood of the reader getting tied up and whipped for sexual pleasure either.

If EA Games were to somehow create and sell a video game titled Mysogyny: Women Suck, the only people who would buy and enjoy such a game would be individuals who already agreed with the game’s clearly stated ideology. Anyone else buying and enjoying the game probably just dabbles in whatever fantasy the game presents during gameplay only. 

The probability of this game somehow CREATING a misogynist is about as likely as your local library’s copy of Mein Kampf creating a Nazi. Any such result would be minuscule if charted in a study of any sort.

As a kid, teen, and adult, I’ve been exposed to TONS of media that has displayed women as the weaker, more submissive, and more sexually desirable gender. However, this is not something I feel is reality. Why? Strong female role models, good upbringing, friends, family, amazing wife, and plenty of real-life interactions with women. FUCK A VIDEO GAME! A healthy reality ALWAYS trumps a fantasy. 

If you really want to change hearts and minds when it comes to gender roles in society, you’ve got to work on changing that society’s reality, not its media—especially media that so explicitly deals in fantasy. I know we tend to blame the media for a lot of our ills, but your real-life interactions and role models play a larger role in guiding your moral and social outlook than any music, movie, game, or book you’ll ever consume.

Anita is on the most foolish of errands, but y’all are eating it up like a hot pizza. Looking for positive gender roles in a game like Hitman is like looking for positive gender roles in any of the three Expendables films. There’s nothing applicable to real life in Hitman because the game’s not meant to guide anyone through real life. It’s a violent video game, not a dating advice show. There aren’t a whole lotta healthy social norms in the game because it’s not meant to portray any sort of normality.

NOW DON’T GET IT TWISTED: I do understand that violent, male-pandering video games persist in the video game industry. They make a lot of money, yes. And I completely acknowledge that a lot of what’s in games like Hitman, Manhunt, and Grand Theft Auto isn’t exactly, uh, healthy when it comes to the gender roles displayed. There’s a definitely a lack of female leading roles in many games, too.

However, it’s not like there aren’t alternatives here. There are plenty of non-violent, positive indie and mainstream games out there that would love more customers. And there could be MORE if we supported this sect of the industry. If Anita really cared about the future of the video game industry in relation to her cause, well, then she’d encourage all of her fans to purchase video games that work outside the negative gender stereotypes and violence of games like Hitman. It’s that simple. Supply and demand might have created Hitman, but it can just as easily create games with positive messages and gender roles, and it already has. You just have to buy them and be willing to support future releases that fit in with your taste.

But Anita is no gamer, and most of her supporters aren’t either. They’re outsiders that want to see change in a market they don’t participate in. Anita’s lack of experience is plain as day, yet, she’s lauded as some kind of expert. What if we applied the same angle to me right here:

Would you take my metal reviews seriously if I owned no metal records? Didn’t listen to metal? Had no real history with metal? Disliked metal? Constantly criticized metal with surface-level complaints like it being too loud, satanic, violent, angry, and perpetuating dangerous, overly masculine gender stereotypes? No, you wouldn’t. No one—except people equally ignorant to metal—would take me seriously. I’d be an ignorant outsider, which Anita is when it comes to gaming.

And I still stand by my PMRC comparison, too. I see similarity in her determination to find social dangers where there really are none. Yeah, Anita has nowhere near the same level of power or political influence, and she probably never will. And she probably won’t try to pull off the same censorship stunts due to the inevitable failure of trying to enforce or legislate any such censorship. It would be more beneficial to her to stay on the sidelines and collect her fundraising bucks as she highlights games she deems misogynistic. I agree America’s got a long way to go when it comes to creating social equality between the genders, but video games are nowhere near the root of the issues we need to address. They’re just an easy target for the quick to complain.

All in all, it’s same shit, different decade. People have been whining and moaning over “harmful” media for generations. And it should be no surprise that those desperately seeking to be offended lose every time. You can be on that side if you want, but just be a good sport when you take your “L”.

geibu:

wacom bamboo pen giveaway.
So tomorrow i’m purchasing a new tablet and won’t need my current one any more, so i’ll be giving it away.
It’s not brand new, I’ve used it but it works perfectly fine, so it’s suitable for giving away- especially cause I know a few people who can’t afford one.
Rules:
don’t have to be following me but it’d be nice!!
reblogs only, like as reference.
For an extra entry you can tell me why you want to win it or submit a cute fact/joke but that’s not mandatory. 
I’ll add in some cute sketches and drawings for the winner.
I’ll choose the winner when this recieves enough notes, probably next month some time.
If you have any questions, feel free to ask.

geibu:

wacom bamboo pen giveaway.

So tomorrow i’m purchasing a new tablet and won’t need my current one any more, so i’ll be giving it away.

It’s not brand new, I’ve used it but it works perfectly fine, so it’s suitable for giving away- especially cause I know a few people who can’t afford one.

  • Rules:
  • don’t have to be following me but it’d be nice!!
  • reblogs only, like as reference.
  • For an extra entry you can tell me why you want to win it or submit a cute fact/joke but that’s not mandatory. 

I’ll add in some cute sketches and drawings for the winner.

I’ll choose the winner when this recieves enough notes, probably next month some time.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask.

loltaku:

If you want a version that can be easily shared.

loltaku:

If you want a version that can be easily shared.

justinmdurden:

Joined the bandwagon. Have some Vivian James.

justinmdurden:

Joined the bandwagon. Have some Vivian James.

sarikyou:

 ス カ ル ガ ー ル ズ 化 不 可 避

sarikyou:

 ス カ ル ガ ー ル ズ 化 不 可 避